William Jobling Gibbeted 1832
#11
Thanks Vikki your imput is appreciated.
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#12
Thanks for your help and information Vikki. I will have to do a lot more digging.
Thank again
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#13
Some photo's from South Shield's Muuseum....Sorry to say,The Glass Mully48 donated to museum Is not on display..(Well I didn't see It),They must have It well hidden..Smile


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#14
Are these the from the Bede Gallery that Vince reay had.? They look very much like them.

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#15
tedg Wrote:Are these the from the Bede Gallery that Vince reay had.? They look very much like them.
Yes,I think they would be from there..
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#16
Took these photo's of the plaque that was unveiled yesterday,It's located where Gaslight Pub used to be...


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#17
Couldn't make the unveiling as I was at work but I was down there at about 8am yesterday Fisherman Smile
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#18
Borrowed a couple of book's from a neighbour of mine,The book's contain lot's of postcard photo's from South Shield's......I thought this one was worth posting on site...


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#19
I come across this article In tonight's Shield's Gazette...

WINE glasses commemorating South Tyneside’s past will be sold at auction next week.

The two 19th century wine glasses commemorate the Jarrow Colliery explosion of 1830 and William Jobling, a South Shields miner and one of the last men in Britain to be hung from a gibbet.

The first of the glasses, which have an estimate of £100, carries the inscription ‘Jarrow Colliery explosion, 1830, 42 lives lost’. The second is engraved with ‘William Jobling, Gibbeted at Jarrow Slake, Aug 3rd, 1832’.

The Jarrow Colliery explosion took place on August 3, 1830, when a release of hydrogen caused a huge explosion early in the morning, killing 42 miners.

Two years later, at the height of the miners’ strikes, William Jobling was arrested for his part in the murder of a local magistrate.

Jobling had been drinking in a Jarrow pub with a friend, Ralph Armstrong, when Armstrong approached the magistrate and begged for money. When he was refused, the magistrate was beaten and later died.

Although it was believed that it was Armstrong who killed the magistrate, he escaped and Jobling was found guilty of murder.

He was sentenced to death and his body was hung on a gibbet and then suspended at Jarrow Slake for all to see.

Fred Wyrley-Birch, of Anderson & Garland, said: “It is interesting how two unlikely glasses can tell such a fascinating story.

“They were created as memories for miners who were from the area, never to forget the injustices they were put through.”

The glasses are believed to have been bought in Jarrow in the 19th century, and were uncovered during a house clearance in Scotland, in the home of a woman whose mother was born in Jarrow in 1878.

The glasses go on sale at Anderson & Garland Auctioneers in Newcastle next Wednesday.
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#20
(30 Jul 14, 7:36 PM)fisherman Wrote:  I come across this article In tonight's Shield's Gazette...

WINE glasses commemorating South Tyneside’s past will be sold at auction next week.

The two 19th century wine glasses commemorate the Jarrow Colliery explosion of 1830 and William Jobling, a South Shields miner and one of the last men in Britain to be hung from a gibbet.

The first of the glasses, which have an estimate of £100, carries the inscription ‘Jarrow Colliery explosion, 1830, 42 lives lost’. The second is engraved with ‘William Jobling, Gibbeted at Jarrow Slake, Aug 3rd, 1832’.

The Jarrow Colliery explosion took place on August 3, 1830, when a release of hydrogen caused a huge explosion early in the morning, killing 42 miners.

Two years later, at the height of the miners’ strikes, William Jobling was arrested for his part in the murder of a local magistrate.

Jobling had been drinking in a Jarrow pub with a friend, Ralph Armstrong, when Armstrong approached the magistrate and begged for money. When he was refused, the magistrate was beaten and later died.

Although it was believed that it was Armstrong who killed the magistrate, he escaped and Jobling was found guilty of murder.

He was sentenced to death and his body was hung on a gibbet and then suspended at Jarrow Slake for all to see.

Fred Wyrley-Birch, of Anderson & Garland, said: “It is interesting how two unlikely glasses can tell such a fascinating story.

“They were created as memories for miners who were from the area, never to forget the injustices they were put through.”

The glasses are believed to have been bought in Jarrow in the 19th century, and were uncovered during a house clearance in Scotland, in the home of a woman whose mother was born in Jarrow in 1878.

The glasses go on sale at Anderson & Garland Auctioneers in Newcastle next Wednesday.
Anybody know what they went for? I've got one very similar but about the Jarrow boat disaster.

(04 Sep 14, 12:47 AM)tedg Wrote:  
(30 Jul 14, 7:36 PM)fisherman Wrote:  I come across this article In tonight's Shield's Gazette...

WINE glasses commemorating South Tyneside’s past will be sold at auction next week.

The two 19th century wine glasses commemorate the Jarrow Colliery explosion of 1830 and William Jobling, a South Shields miner and one of the last men in Britain to be hung from a gibbet.

The first of the glasses, which have an estimate of £100, carries the inscription ‘Jarrow Colliery explosion, 1830, 42 lives lost’. The second is engraved with ‘William Jobling, Gibbeted at Jarrow Slake, Aug 3rd, 1832’.

The Jarrow Colliery explosion took place on August 3, 1830, when a release of hydrogen caused a huge explosion early in the morning, killing 42 miners.

Two years later, at the height of the miners’ strikes, William Jobling was arrested for his part in the murder of a local magistrate.

Jobling had been drinking in a Jarrow pub with a friend, Ralph Armstrong, when Armstrong approached the magistrate and begged for money. When he was refused, the magistrate was beaten and later died.

Although it was believed that it was Armstrong who killed the magistrate, he escaped and Jobling was found guilty of murder.

He was sentenced to death and his body was hung on a gibbet and then suspended at Jarrow Slake for all to see.

Fred Wyrley-Birch, of Anderson & Garland, said: “It is interesting how two unlikely glasses can tell such a fascinating story.

“They were created as memories for miners who were from the area, never to forget the injustices they were put through.”

The glasses are believed to have been bought in Jarrow in the 19th century, and were uncovered during a house clearance in Scotland, in the home of a woman whose mother was born in Jarrow in 1878.

The glasses go on sale at Anderson & Garland Auctioneers in Newcastle next Wednesday.
Anybody know what they went for? I've got one very similar but about the Jarrow boat disaster.

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