The jarrow crusade
#31
Chic Wrote:Hi JP, I wonder if you can help me? After reading this very interesting post I think one of the marchers could be my great uncle - James Allison. Anyway I can find out who his parents were? By the way I went to an interesting talk on the Jarrow Crusade this week in Jarrow library given by Matt Perry.

Only you can solve that

I surely know less than you .........

Unless you elaborate more?
You had to be at least 18 years old (was your James 18 in October '36' ?)

Jarrow Crusade October 1936

James Allison living 26 Stanley Street Back

there were 5 James Allison's born between 1876 and 1917
1 born Westoe 1897
1 born Jarrow 1901
1 born Jarrow 1902
1 born Jarrow 1908
1 born Jarrow 1917 (his mothers maiden name was Barget)
(born after 1917 they would have been too young - born before 1876 they would of been older than 60?)
#32
Cait Wrote:Hello and welcome to the site waterlillySmile. Your family must be so proud of your uncle John Kelly, he and others took part in a very historic march.
Did he by chance pass on any memories or stories within the family, that maybe you could share on site? cheers CaitSmile
Hi Cait,Sorry i havn't answered you before now as i havn't been to well , ok now.All i know is my Fathers brother John Kelly was on the march.I remember him telling the story of how people fed them and even gave them shoes to replace the worn out ones. He told us as children that it was very hard and they had some tough times but it was worth doing even though they got nothing at the end of it . Thats all i can tell you i'm afraid. Kind regards
#33
waterlilly Wrote:Hi Cait,Sorry i havn't answered you before now as i havn't been to well , ok now.All i know is my Fathers brother John Kelly was on the march.I remember him telling the story of how people fed them and even gave them shoes to replace the worn out ones. He told us as children that it was very hard and they had some tough times but it was worth doing even though they got nothing at the end of it . Thats all i can tell you i'm afraid. Kind regards

Thanks for your reply, yes they had some very tough times...
Truly hope my message finds you feeling a little better....blessings Cait
#34
yes three daughters , Muriel, Doreen, and Ada. I believe Ada is still with us.
#35
I'm apprehensive to say the least about what I'm going to say but steel myself and go for it....

Ellen wilkinson wasn't a leader of the Jarrow March for work. She had been 'involved' in other hunger marches previously and the Jarrow March was being organised before she came on board but politically, it was a good move on her part.

All the councillors rode on a bus [while the Jarrow men walked], getting off the bus just before reaching every town/city they came to and went to the front of the marchers 'leading them' into the towns/cities.

A collection was taken everywhere they went but the Jarrow Marchers did not have anything to do with the collection of money - the Councillors did this

Everywhere they went to people freely gave refreshments and somewhere to stay overnight.
#36
joanii Wrote:I'm apprehensive to say the least about what I'm going to say but steel myself and go for it....

Ellen wilkinson wasn't a leader of the Jarrow March for work. She had been 'involved' in other hunger marches previously and the Jarrow March was being organised before she came on board but politically, it was a good move on her part.

All the councillors rode on a bus [while the Jarrow men walked], getting off the bus just before reaching every town/city they came to and went to the front of the marchers 'leading them' into the towns/cities.

A collection was taken everywhere they went but the Jarrow Marchers did not have anything to do with the collection of money - the Councillors did this

Everywhere they went to people freely gave refreshments and somewhere to stay overnight.
Thanks for that news Joanii i didn't know that.Just like the councillors isn't it
#37
hi everyone

thanks for a great site my grand father was one of the marchers
William Connor 8 witton gardens I know very little about him as he died in 1937 but i remember going to see my nana up till she died in 1966 my uncle Ernie was the last Connor living there he died in the late 80' early 90's I was at sea for 20 years and people all over the world knew Jarrow for 2 things 'The March' and 'the ships' They may not have had any luck with the government but their memory lived on world wide
#38
dcon Wrote:hi everyone

thanks for a great site my grand father was one of the marchers
William Connor 8 witton gardens I know very little about him as he died in 1937 but i remember going to see my nana up till she died in 1966 my uncle Ernie was the last Connor living there he died in the late 80' early 90's I was at sea for 20 years and people all over the world knew Jarrow for 2 things 'The March' and 'the ships' They may not have had any luck with the government but their memory lived on world wide

My father and his family moved from Ferry Street to number 11 Witton Gardens in 1933 when the houses were just built
He would of been 14 years old
During there war they moved to the top end of the street across the road to number 20 Witton Gardens
My father lived there up to 1947 till he got married
His mother lived there till she died in 1967
My father is still alive age 91
I will ask him when I see him if he can he remember the Connor's .............

Mind my father often says in 1936 he has very little recollection of the march
Aged 17 he was down Bedford labouring in the Steel Mills
And his sister aged 16 was down London working in service
As they had no father, they had to travel for work, to send money home for their mother and 3 younger sisters at Witton Gardens
Like most kids in Jarrow, once you left school you had to leave home to find a job, to send money home
#39
jarraman Wrote:NAMES OF THE MARCHERS

[TABLE]Abbott W| 63 High Street
Allison James| 26 Back Stanley Street
Anderson Samuel| 18 Derby Street
... | ...
Wilson M |35 Princess Street
Winship Robert |13 Franklin Street
Young Chas |52 Albion Street
[/TABLE]








I've started a Google Map to give all these crusaders a home, if you want to get involved then:
  1. Go to http://maps.google.com/maps/ms?ie=UTF&msa=0&msid=105323206518256047701.00048cd4bb8ef9107573e
  2. Zoom right in;
  3. Click the Edit button on the left (you may have to login first);
  4. Click on a crusader's name on the left and remember the location of the blue marker;
  5. Click the Cancel button;
  6. Drag the blue marker to the crusader's home address;
  7. Repeat from step 4 or click Done.
    • With a bit of local knowledge and some fine tuning, we can find a home for these crusaders.
#40
Just Passing Wrote:My father and his family moved from Ferry Street to number 10 Witton Gardens in 1933 (next door) when the houses were just built
He would of been 14 years old
My father lived there up to 1947 till he got married
His mother lived there till she died in 1967
My father is still alive age 91
I will ask him when I see him if he can he remember the Connor's .............

Mind my father often says in 1936 he has very little recollection of the march
Aged 17 he was down Bradford labouring in the Steel Mills
And his sister aged 16 was down London working in service
As they had no father, they had to travel for work, to send money home for their mother and 3 younger sisters at Witton Gardens
Like most kids in Jarrow, once you left school you had to leave home to find a job, to send money home


my dad was Sydney Brown Connor unfortuanatly he died aged 44 of a heart attack in 1973 there was Bill Betty who married Tucker Thopmson in prudhoe grove Jennie Edith my dad Ernie Margaret and Geordie
I do not remember if i saw a picture of my grandfather I think there was one of him on the march but i think it was lost long ago It will be amazing if your father remembers the Connors I did not expect anyone to remeber them




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