The Zeppelin Raid on Jarrow 1915
#1
[Image: zzPL0208.jpg]


On Tuesday 15th June 1915 the Zeppelin LZ40 (L10) of the German Navy on its first flight, commandeered by Kapitan Leutnant Hisch crossed the coast north of Blyth and headed directly for Wallsend where bombs were dropped on the Marine Engineering Works causing severe damage.
It flew over Palmer’s Shipyard in Jarrow about 11.40pm and dropped 7 Heavy Explosive and 5 Incendiary Bombs killing 16 men and injuring 72.


[Image: BombDrop.jpg]


Most of the casualties had been waving at the Zeppelin moments before not knowing what it was or what its intentions were.

The HMS Marshall Ney was on the stocks at the time ready to be launched.
No damage could of been done to it as it was launched 2 days later on 17th June 1915.

[Image: HMSMarshalNeyUnderwayPortsideView1915.jpg]

North of the river again, bombs fell at Willington where they damaged Cookson's Antimony Works and Pochin's Chemical Works and several houses.
A policeman died at Willington Quay.
The L10 then headed for the sea dropping bombs on Haxton Colliery and South Shields on the way.
The bombing must have been highly censured at the time having just a few lines in the Shields Gazette on Thursday 17th June 1915
It just stated 16 killed which included a policeman and 40 injured when a Zeppelin bombed Jarrow and did not include any names.
On Friday 18th June 1915 in the Shields Gazette, there was a small column regarding the inquest and noted the following 14 were killed in the Palmer yard:

Albert Bramley 54
Matthew Carter 66
Carl Karling 24
Joseph Lane 67
Robert Thomas Nixon 32
Frederick Pinnock 29
Lawrence Frazer Sanderson 16
Thomas Henry Smith 23
Ralph Snaith
William Grieves Turner 20
John George Windle 22
William Erskine Cook Young 16
William Stamford
Joseph Bechworth Thornycroft 31

It also mentioned Ann Elizabeth Laughlin 62 who was living across from the yard had died of shock.

These 2 must of died later from wounds as they were commemorated at the Palmer yard on the civilian Plaque
John Cuthbert Davison
George Ward

Extra info:
Albert Bramley (he was commemorated on the plaque at the Palmer Yard. He was buried in Jarrow Cemetery)
Matthew Carter (his death was registered as age 55 and he was commemorated on the plaque at the Palmer Yard and the triptych at St. Mark’s Church. A Fitter. Son of William and Jane Carter. Husband of Caroline Carter.)
John Cuthbert Davison (his death was registered at Newcastle age 31 and he was commemorated on the plaque at the Palmer Yard. Born Sunderland. Buried in Jarrow Cemetery. Son of Thomas and Ann Davidson)
Carl Karling (his death was registered as Karl Johan W. Kalnin age 22 and he was commemorated on the plaque at the Palmer Yard. He was buried in Jarrow Cemetery)
Joseph Lane (He was buried in JarrowCemetery)
Ann Elizabeth Laughlin (her death was registered as Ann Isabella Laughlin. Buried in Jarrow Cemetery. Born Inverness. Wife of Thomas Laughlin)
Robert Thomas Nixon (he was commemorated on the plaque at the Palmer Yard. He was buried in Jarrow Cemetery.)
Frederick Pinnock (his death was registered as age 31. He was buried in Jarrow Cemetery. Born Jarrow. Son of Robert and Caroline Pinnock)
Lawrence Frazer Sanderson (he was commemorated on the plaque at the Palmer Yard. He was buried Jarrow Cemetery. Born Jarrow. Son of Lawrence Frazer and Ellen Sanderson)
Thomas Henry Smith (he is commemorated on the Monkton Memorial and was commemorated on the plaque at the Palmer yard. He also has a headstone at Jarrow Cemetery. Born Hebburn and living in Jarrow. Son of Frederick and Pollie Smith of Jarrow)

[Image: proxy?max_age=604800&url=http%3A...06b1ae.jpg]

Ralph Snaith (his death was registered as age 48. He was buried Jarrow Cemetery)
William Stamford (cannot find any registered death? He was buried Jarrow Cemetery)
Joseph Bechworth Thornycroft (cannot find any registered death?)
William Grieves Turner (he was commemorated on the plaque at the Palmer Yard and the triptych at St. Mark’s Church. He also has a headstone at Jarrow Cemetery. Born Jarrow. Son of John and Elizabeth Turner)

[Image: proxy?max_age=604800&url=http%3A...339c2f.jpg]

John George Windle (his death was registered as age 27 and he was commemorated on the plaque at the Palmer Yard. Buried Jarrow Cemetery. Born Upperby Carlisle. Son of Robert and Mary Windle)
William Erskine Cook Young (he was commemorated on the plaque at the Palmer Yard. He also has a headstone at Jarrow Cemetery. Son of David and Isabella Dunn Young)

[Image: proxy?max_age=604800&url=http%3A...27efee.jpg]

George Ward (his death was registered at Newcastle age 18 and he was commemorated on the plaque at the Palmer Yard. He also has a headstone at Jarrow Cemetery)

[Image: proxy?max_age=604800&url=http%3A...7f9e2a.jpg]

There was a plaque with 12 names on it at one time in the Palmer Shipyard (which is now Dowe Chemicals)
But what became of it?

This was the inscription on it:

Jarrow Palmers Shipyard

In Honour of

Albert Bramley
Matthew Carter
John Cuthbert Davison
Karl Kalnin
Robert Thomas Nixon
Lawrence Frazer Sanderson
Thomas Henry Smith
Ralph Snaith
William Grieves Turner
George Ward
John George Windle
William Erskine Cook Young

Who were killed near this spot by a bomb dropped from a German Airship whilst serving there King and Country on the night of 15th June 1915

This Memorial is erected by the Board of Directors of Jarrow Palmer's
Reply
#2
I saw another stone in the cemetary, it was to a manager at palmers yard from the workers of the fitting shop.The inscription was very close to the ground.I think Ihave a rough idea of where it is.I'll try and find it next weekend.There's a postcard or a picture of the Zeppelin over Jarrow kicking about.saw it once on Ebay

Reply
#3
If its the grave I think you mean, he had nothing to do with the Zeppelin Raid
But still check it out
Feel free to add to this thread Ted

ps I am sending you that info now on Francis
Reply
#4
Cheers much appreciated

Reply
#5
A brilliant article and research. Many thanks for that.
Reply
#6
Wow!, excellent post!

To be honest, I didn't realise Jarrow had received any significant bombing, always thought we were too far North.

One thing puzzles me, presumably the airship took off from Germany and would've had to travel to Jarrow over land (or at least along the coast). How come it wasn't shot down before it got so far North?

Any educated guesses anyone?

Many thanks again for an excellent post Just Passing.
You can take the lad out of Jarrow but you can't take Jarrow out of the lad.
Reply
#7
Just Passing Wrote:On Tuesday 15th June 1915 the Zeppelin LZ40 (L10) of the German Navy on its first flight, commandeered by Kapitan Leutnant Hisch crossed the coast north of Blyth and headed directly for Wallsend where bombs were dropped on the Marine Engineering Works causing severe damage.
It flew over Palmer’s Shipyard in Jarrow about 11.40pm

It had not far to travel overland from Blyth to Wallsend then over to Jarrow.
Plus it was just before midnight
They had no anti aircraft guns and searchlights
I should imagine it would of come over out of reach of rifle shot
Plus no Home Guard
The Navy or Shore Batteries could only hit ships not flying balloons
Reply
#8
wow!! what a brilliant post...many thanks for sharing cheers Cait
Reply
#9
Lets hope someone can contribute more to it? i.e. descendants of those who died
After all its Jarrows History
If its not told it will be forgotten..................
There are only 4 headstones (that I know of) in Jarrow Cemetery and there was 17 who died (including Ann Isabella Laughlin)
There was only 12 commemorated on the plaque that were commemorated by the shipyard (that has now dissapeared or has it?)
But let us not forget those who died and are buried in Jarrow Cemetery and never even had a marker for a grave.......................
Reply
#10
I used to work at Sterling Foundry Specialties Ltd. and the plaque you mentioned was in the factory which had previously been Palmers. When the new Sterling was built on Ellison Street the plaque was moved to the new office reception there and may possibly still be there. There were stories that the steel stores where the people were killed was haunted and on the few occasions when I went in the stores it was always freezing cold even in the middle of summer.
Reply




Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)